Germany 1916-23

A Revolution in Context

During the last four decades the German Revolution 1918/19 has only attracted little scholarly attention.

This volume offers new cultural historical perspectives, puts this revolution into a wider time frame (1916-23), and coheres around three interlinked propositions: (i) acknowledging that during its initial stage the German Revolution reflected an intense social and political challenge to state authority and its monopoly of physical violence, (ii) it was also replete with »Angst«-ridden wrangling over its longer-term meaning and direction, and (iii) was characterized by competing social movements that tried to cultivate citizenship in a new, unknown state.

€39.99 *

2015-05-05, 266 pages
ISBN: 978-3-8376-2734-3

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Recommend it

Klaus Weinhauer

Klaus Weinhauer, University of Bielefeld, Germany

Anthony McElligott

Anthony McElligott, University of Limerick, Ireland

Kirsten Heinsohn

Kirsten Heinsohn, University of Copenhagen, Dänemark

... with Klaus Weinhauer, Anthony McElligott and Kirsten Heinsohn

1. Why a book on this subject?

Revolutions and violent upheavals are among the most pressing problems of the contemporary world. To understand them we have to know their history. Interestingly, the German Revolution 1918/19 is massively understudied. This is all the more true for its violent aspects. The last historical monograph on the German Revolution 1918/19 dates from 1985. Thus, it can hardly come as a surprise that, some recent exceptions given, innovative culturally informed approaches still are still very much absent from this field.

2. What relevance does this subject have in the current research debates?

In the next years, due to its centennial, the Revolution 1918/19 will gain much international attention. As this revolution was strongly influenced by World War I, the current debates about this war will in the years to come also refer to the end of WWI, which in countries like Ireland (1916), Russia (1917), and Germany (1918) caused revolutionary, often violent upheavals. Our book also discusses the transnational effects of the Revolution as it affected the imaginations of political and economic elites and also the media in the USA and in European states.

3. What new perspectives does your book open up?

It offers new cultural historical perspectives on the German Revolution 1918/19, puts this revolution in a wider time frame (1916-23), and coheres around three interlinked propositions: Since its early phase the German Revolution reflected an intense social and political challenge to state authority and its monopoly of physical violence; the revolution was replete with ›Angst‹-ridden wrangling over its longer-term meaning and direction, and it was characterized by competing social movements that tried to cultivate citizenship in a new, unknown state.

4. Who would you preferably like to discuss your book with?

With historians who have just published new books on the first World War or on the history of violence: Prof. Jörn Leonhard (Freiburg), Prof. Roger Chickering (Georgetown, USA), Prof. Benjamin Ziemann (Sheffield), Prof. Andreas Wirsching (Munich); Prof. Alexander Gallus (Rostock); Prof Michael Mann (UCLA, USA); Prof. Belinda Davis (Rutgers University, USA), Prof. Eric Selbin (Southwestern University, USA); Prof. Friedrich Lenger (Gießen); Prof. Dieter Schott (Darmstadt).

5. Your book in only one sentence:

It offers new culturally based re-interpretations of the German Revolution 1918/19 contextualized in wider geographical and time frames.

Book title
Germany 1916-23 A Revolution in Context
Publisher
transcript Verlag
Pages
266
Features
kart.
ISBN
978-3-8376-2734-3
DOI
Commodity Group
1558
BIC-Code
HBJD HBLW
BISAC-Code
HIS014000 HIS037070 HIS010000
THEMA-Code
NHD
Release date
2015-05-05
Edition
1
Topics
Kulturgeschichte, Europa
Readership
Cultural History, History, Political Science, Media Science, Cultural Studies, Literary Studies and the general Public
Keywords/Tags
Revolution, Violence, Social Movements, Subjectivity, Angst, Cultural History, Europe, German History, History of the 20th Century, European History, History

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